Lighting and Landscape Act

District 2 Zone 45

(LLA D 2 z 45)

What is the Lighting and Landscape Act District 2 Zone 45?

The Lighting and Landscape Act District 2 Zone 45 (LLAD 2 z 45) refers to a measure that was voted on by Lake Los Angeles parcel owners within specific boundaries (see map) to provide funds for building and maintaining a public park within Lake Los Angeles. Each property (parcel) within the boundary area is subject to an annual tax of approximately $60 per year.

Due to the fact that these funds are collected by Los Angeles County and the Park is part of the Los Angeles Department of Parks and Recreation, , the Lake Los Angeles Park Association (LLAPA) was established to give a voice to the residents who pay this tax in determining future park and recreational needs at the Los Angeles County Park located in Lake Los Angeles.

Map of LLA D 2 z 45 Boundaries

How much do I pay for the LLA D 2 z 45?

Each parcel that is within the assessment boundaries pay an annual assessment of approximately $60 per year. The amount is the same regardless of how large or small of a home is built on the parcel and regardless of how many people occupy the home. The amount of the assessment has remained the same since it was voted on in 1992.

How does the assessment show on my property tax bill?

Property Tax Bill Direct Assessments Detail for a property within the boundaries of the Lighting and Landscape Act District 2 Zone 45. The assessment is listed on this bill as LLAD#2 ZN45 LAKL

Note :the other Park funding measure that ALL properties in Los Angeles County are assessed or is the RPOSD Measure A which is the other source of Park funding. See Measure A for more information.

How does the LLA D 2 z 45 benefit me?

As a resident in the assessment area, you are contributing funds towards both the ongoing upkeep and maintenance of the park in LLA, as well as contributing towards future capital improvements at the park. The funds that are collected by the LLAD 2 z 45 are combined with other funding sources, such as Measure A, which are then used to build further recreational facilities in LLA.

What can the LLA D 2 z 45 funds be spent on? Where can they be spent?

Map of Stephen Sorensen Park, the green area is the current footprint of the Park


The funds that are collected by Los Angeles County from the LLAD 2 z 45 can only be spent on the growth and development of the Stephen Sorensen County Park. Despite the name of the act including the words "lighting and landscape" these funds are not available for any other purpose than the local park in LLA. The funds can only be spent on recreational needs at the LLA park.

What is the LLAPA involvement with the LLA D 2 z 45?

The LLAPA is the voice of the community with Los Angeles County for recreational needs to benefit our community. The LLPA advises LA County as to what the community who pays the annual assessment wants the funding to be allocated for. See Capital Improvements for additional information.

Memo from Park President Mary Hanna Re: LLAD 2 z 45 and Accelerated Foreclosure

There was a concern about the accelerated foreclosure wording in the LLAD 2, 45. I have been in communication with Supervisor Barger's office and asked that it be investigated. A member of the community wrote a paper stating that properties could be subjected to this procedure if the park association were to borrow from the assessment again (as was done to build the baseball diamond, basketball court, multipurpose field, sidewalks, and lights) to bring money together for a large capital improvement.

I got a response from LA County Tax office about the Accelerated Foreclosure : "The accelerated foreclosure process was NEVER used in Lake Los Angeles.

The accelerated foreclosure process was a legal possibility only because the 1972 legislation under which the Lake LA parks levy was created was itself based on a 1915 law. The 1915 law allowed accelerated foreclosures on land taxed for streets and other improvements.

Landscape and Lighting Act districts like the Lake LA district are far down the list of priority for recouping money owned on a property, and does not create a lien on a property, so it is never the reason for initiating a foreclosure."

I hope this begins to clear up any misunderstandings.

Mary Hanna, President LLAPA

6/18/2018